a second look, birds, Florida wildlife, life, life goes on, nature, perseverance, photography, second chances, sunrise, unintended consequences

Fred’s story…

When I get up early enough to go out for the sunrise I usually open my front door to look outside to see what the sky looks like.  But lately I think I’m hoping that it looks overcast enough to stay home.  Then I can pat myself on the back for not wasting time, but then I waste time at home so really all I would save is gas.  When I look out and see a crescent moon in a clear sky, especially when it’s in the eastern sky, then I can’t resist going out.  In my mind I see a nice sunrise with the crescent moon above, but in all honesty I don’t think that shot has ever presented itself.  The moon is too high, and the sunrise colors were developing slightly to the north.06-16-20aripekamoon

There are two bridges to shoot from in Aripeka, and the first has houses that I hope will have lights on to give extra interest to the shot.  This morning there were no lights, but there were plenty of no-see-ums, so I moved on.06-16-20aripeka1stbridge

The second bridge is where I always hope to see One-Foot Fred, but he wasn’t out today.  But one of the neighbors walked out to watch the sunrise and it turned out that he is the guy I recently heard call Fred’s name, and when Fred flew over he was treated to breakfast.  I mentioned to him that I used to see Fred whenever I came for the sunrise, but then didn’t see him for a long while.  He told me that the Great Blue Herons are very territorial and the two-footed heron that I did see had run Fred off.  But as happens so often when these birds co-exist with fishermen, that heron got tangled up in fishing line, and someone cut the line instead of untangling him, so he flew off, but only barely, and it was surely a death sentence for that bird.  Sad news for that bird, but good news for Fred who is back, and comes for breakfast every day, he said.  Finger mullet, about $10 worth a day.

Fred was luckier than that other heron.  He also became tangled up in fishing line, but this gentleman and another one worked to cut him free, all except for that foot, because Fred became so violent that they had to let him go.  He said it was awful to watch as that foot became useless and eventually just wasn’t there anymore.  It does seem that human interaction with wildlife is usually not in the animal’s best interest.  But for now Fred seems to have it made, I hope it lasts…

06-16-20aripekaglimmer06-16-20aripekasunset

And always check the sky behind you for reflections in the clouds.06-16-20aripekareflection

4 thoughts on “Fred’s story…”

  1. Thank you for sharing Fred’s back story. I agree that “it does seem that human interaction with wildlife is usually not in the animal’s best interest.” Sadly — so deeply sad that most of us can’t bear to think about it and remain in denial — we are in the midst of an phenomenal era of animal and plant extinction which will come to haunt our children and grandchildren. And it’s all due to how we human beings have taken over planet earth with little respect for the amazing, interlocking cycles of life which we are a part of… including beautiful sunrises and sunsets! Deep breath in. Deep breath out.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Beautifully said, nice words about an ugly subject. Yesterday I merrily took pictures of pelicans who were scavenging at a boat ramp near me. But as I looked at the pictures in my computer I thought at first that I needed to have my camera sensor cleaned, but then I realized that what I was seeing was fishing line trailing from one of the pelicans. It doesn’t appear that it was hindering him, his wings were free at least, but I wish life was more like the Disney movies of our childhood…

      Like

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